Dictionary of the Unexplained

Dictionary of the Unexplained

I just bought this book, and it’s f***ing brilliant! Forget the Twilight Zone, X-files, E.T., A.I., Star Wars, Star Trek, Twin Peaks, 2001: A Space Odyssey, Close Encounters of the Third Kind, Ghostbusters, The Exorcist, Bigfoot and all…

With over 1250 alphabetical entries, Chambers Dictionary of the Unexplained covers a broad range of concepts, individual cases and specialist terms. The clear, two-colour layout and full-colour illustrations and photographs make it a joy to browse. Where else could you learn the secrets of Scientology or the facts about feng shui, then spook yourself with tales of haunted highways and poltergeists before attempting to get to the bottom of the Mary Celeste? Written in consultation with leading experts in their fields, the book also includes 24 in-depth articles on popular subjects such as ghosts, witchcraft and alternative medicine. In addition, 30 fascinating panels give details of individual cases, covering household names like the Loch Ness Monster as well as lesserknown phenomena like the Black Dog of Bungay and the Belgian wave.

With its carefully researched, in-depth and balanced entries on topics ranging from alien abductions to the zodiac and from traditional myths to urban legends, Chambers Dictionary of the Unexplained is a major new addition to the Chambers reference list. Far from being just a book for diehard conspiracy theorists or obsessive wizard watchers, this is a comprehensive reference work for anyone with an interest in the mysterious world of ‘the unexplained’. (Chambers Press)

Thanks to cryptozoologist T.G. La Rivière